How to switch to a healthy diet this New Year

How to switch to a healthy diet this New Year

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Muscat: Whatever your New Year’s Resolution, a healthy and balanced diet will provide many benefits into 2019 and beyond. What we eat and drink can affect our body’s ability to fight infections, as well as how likely we are to develop health problems later in life, including obesity, heart disease, diabetes and different types of cancer, the World Health Organization (WHO), said on Thursday.

The exact ingredients of a healthy diet will depend on different factors like how old and how active we are, as well as the kinds of foods that are available in the communities where we live. But across cultures, there are some common food tips for helping us lead healthier, longer lives.

The WHO, said: “There are five top tips for healthy diet which are to eat a variety of food, cut back on salt, reduce use of certain fats and oil, limit sugar intake, and avoid hazardous and harmful alcohol use.”

On variety in food, the WHO said: “Our bodies are incredibly complex, and (with the exception of breast milk for babies) no single food contains all the nutrients we need for them to work at their best. Our diets must therefore contain a wide variety of fresh and nutritious foods to keep us going strong.”

There are some tips to ensure a balanced diet, aim to eat a mix of staple foods such as wheat, maize, rice and potatoes with legumes like lentils and beans, plenty of fresh fruit and veg, and foods from animal sources (e.g. meat, fish, eggs and milk), the WHO, added.

Choose wholegrain foods like unprocessed maize, millet, oats, wheat and brown rice when you can; they are rich in valuable fibre and can help you feel full for longer.

For snacks, choose raw vegetables, unsalted nuts and fresh fruit, rather than foods that are high in sugars, fats or salt.

“Too much salt can raise blood pressure, which is a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Most people around the world eat too much salt: on average, we consume double the WHO recommended limit of 5 grams (equivalent to a teaspoon) a day,” the WHO added.

Even if we don’t add extra salt in our food, we should be aware that it is commonly put in processed foods or drinks, and often in high amounts.

Some tips to reduce your salt intake:

When cooking and preparing foods, use salt sparingly and reduce use of salty sauces and condiments, like soy sauce, stock or fish sauce.

Avoid snacks that are high in salt, and try and choose fresh healthy snacks over processed foods.

The WHO confirmed that when using canned or dried vegetables, nuts and fruit, one should choose varieties without added salt and sugars.

“Remove salt and salty condiments from the table and try and avoid adding them out of habit; our tastebuds can quickly adjust and once they do, you are likely to enjoy food with less salt, but more flavor.”

Check the labels on food and go for products with lower sodium content.

The WHO, concluded that: “We all need some fat in our diet, but eating too much – especially the wrong kinds – increases risks of obesity, heart disease and stroke. Industrially-produced trans fats are the most hazardous for health. A diet high in this kind of fat has been found to raise risk of heart disease by nearly 30%.”


Image Source:*Wikimedia Commons

Source:timesofoman.com


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